How did President Franklin Roosevelt re-define the meaning of economic freedom over the course of the New Deal? 

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People had to give up a certain amount of freedom in order to ensure more freedoms for all with the New Deal. The New Deal ended speculative excesses by banks and Wall Street, with programs such as the FDIC and the Securities and Exchange Commission. People had to know that their bank deposits were safe and insured. People also had to be aware that insiders could not get an upper hand on other investors on Wall Street. While these practices limited freedoms for some, they made the system more fair and leveled the playing field for smaller investors and depositors.

People also had to give up freedoms in business practices too. The Agricultural Adjustment Act provided subsidy checks in order to prevent farmers from overproducing and sending too many goods to the market at one time. Although farmers were now told they had a limit on what they could produce, they also received compensation if the market for their goods was poor.

People also gave up freedoms to provide for the elderly and...

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