How did the Otis twins trouble the ghost? 

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In "The Canterville Ghost ," the ghost is constantly troubled by the twins, the youngest children of Mr and Mrs Otis. Nicknamed 'The Stars and the Stripes,' the twins are boisterous and mischievous and delight in terrorizing the ghost. Like the rest of their family, they feel no fear...

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In "The Canterville Ghost," the ghost is constantly troubled by the twins, the youngest children of Mr and Mrs Otis. Nicknamed 'The Stars and the Stripes,' the twins are boisterous and mischievous and delight in terrorizing the ghost. Like the rest of their family, they feel no fear towards the ghost and are motivated only by the desire to humiliate him. 

Their first attack on the ghost comes in Chapter Three when the ghost appears on a Sunday evening. He has tried to wear an antique suit of armour but his attempt has failed and, instead, the twins attack him with their pea-shooters. Later, in Chapter Four, the ghost has another run-in with the twins. This time, they have constructed a "butter slide" from the entrance to the Tapestry Chamber to the top of oak staircase. Unaware, the ghost slips on the slide and falls over which so enrages him that he becomes determined to have his revenge. 

Dressed as "Reckless Rupert," the ghost makes his way to the Blue Bed Chamber where he thinks the twins are sleeping. But, on opening the chamber door, he is drenched by a heavy jug of water which the twins have placed there. This prompts "stifled shrieks of laughter" from the bed and, feeling completely humiliated, the ghost retreats to his room. 

After this incident, the  twins lie in wait for the ghost every night. They "strewed the passages with nutshells" in an attempt to make him fall over but the ghost does not appear. The ghost's pride is seriously wounded and he retreats completely from the presence of the Otis family. This is a turning point in the story which brings about his depression and, in the longer term, brings him one step closer to redemption and eternal rest.  

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