How did Napoleon use violence in Animal Farm?

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Napoleon uses violence in Animal Farmfor various means and ends. One reason for the use of violence is the consolidation of power; however, he also uses violence to instill fear in the other animals, manipulate their behavior, and ultimately eradicate the chance of potential opposition to his leadership.

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Napoleon uses violence in Animal Farm for various means and ends. One reason for the use of violence is the consolidation of power; however, he also uses violence to instill fear in the other animals, manipulate their behavior, and ultimately eradicate the chance of potential opposition to his leadership.

Overt violence is used to instill fear in the animals, increase conformity, and solidify Napoleon's position. In the book, Napoleon raises and trains nine farm puppies to act as his private bodyguards and army. In chapter 7, Napoleon assembles all the animals and forces four pigs who questioned him to confess that they have secretly been taking orders from Snowball. Immediately following their confession, the dogs rip the pigs' throats out. This and the subsequent killings of other animals who claim to have committed various crimes is proof of the brutality of Napoleon's leadership. It is used to send a clear message to the terrified animals about the future fate of any animal who opposes or threatens his position in any way, thus reducing the chance of any future rebellions.

Persistent violence is also used to manipulate the other animals and influence their behavior. Violence and the threat of violence coerces the animals into working harder, for example. The killing of the four pigs and other animals in chapter 7 leads Boxer to declare that they have failed in some way and that the animals must work harder. Violence is therefore used to manipulate the intellectually inferior animals into doing the pigs' and Napoleon's bidding, to exhort the other animals to work harder, and even to die for the good of the farm.

Interestingly, toward the end of the book, whips become symbolic of the threat of violence. Although the whips were supposedly destroyed in the revolution, in chapter 10 the animals are dismayed to see Napoleon walking upright with a whip in his trotter. The whips were reviled by the animals and evoke pain and terror, as whips were used by Mr. Jones and his men as methods of punishment and torture. While the whips are symbolic of Napoleon's domination and now human-like power, their very existence compels the animals to unquestioningly accept the pigs' new behavior and increasingly human traits.

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Napoleon uses violence and the threat of violence to consolidate his power. The Animalist revolution was supposed to usher in a peaceful utopia, when all the farm animals would work together for the common good. But that's not how things have turned out. Instead, Napoleon and the other pigs have established a ruthless dictatorship, which is becoming increasingly violent and bloody in its methods of control.

A prime example of this comes when the hens refuse to give up their eggs, which Napoleon plans to sell to local farms in clear violation of Old Major's teachings. Napoleon brutally cracks down on the hens' rebellion, and during a meeting of all the animals he extracts phony confessions from the supposed ringleaders of the recent rebellion. They are then immediately slaughtered on the spot. Such barbarism makes a mockery of the sixth commandment, that no animal shall kill any other animal.

The slaughter of the hens shows Napoleon becoming much more brazen in the use of violence. Previously, after the hens rebelled, Napoleon cut their rations, which led to nine of them dying of starvation. Afterwards, the lie was put out that they'd died of coccidiosis. But this latest act of murder takes place in plain sight, the better to instill fear in the other animals and to make them think twice about challenging Napoleon's increasingly despotic regime.

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In the novella Animal Farm by George Orwell, the character Napoleon uses violence not only to consolidate and enforce his power but also to instill fear in the other animals on the farm.

One instance of Napoleon's use of violence is when he takes Bluebell and Jessie's newborn pups and raises them to be guard dogs. These are the same dogs that chase Snowball off of the farm. Orwell writes, "there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs, wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn." The dogs are used throughout the novel to intimidate other animals.

At the end of the novel, Napoleon carries around a whip. This suggests that he has now become the ultimate "dictator" of the farm, something Old Major didn't envision when he set forth his vision of the farm.

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As was mentioned in the previous post, Napoleon uses violence to consolidate and enforce his power. Initially, Napoleon raises nine enormous dogs and sends them after Snowball during an assembly meeting in the barn. Snowball is driven out of the farm by the dogs, and Napoleon is able to usurp power. With Snowball gone, Napoleon begins to rule Animal Farm like a tyrant. Napoleon's ferocious dogs do his bidding by intimidating and murdering the other animals on the farm. The dogs are loyal to Napoleon and represent Stalin's joint law enforcement agency, the NKVD. Throughout the novella, Napoleon uses his dogs to prevent the hens from eating their food rations while they are protesting. The dogs also carry out Napoleon's orders to execute those who confess to colluding with Snowball. The dogs end up killing four pigs, three hens, one goose, and a sheep in front of the other animals after they confess to being influenced by Snowball. Napoleon uses his dogs to intimidate and harm the animals in order to maintain his tyrannical rule of the farm.  

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Napoleon hand raises a group of puppies into fierce, violent dogs that guard him and do his bidding. He uses them to consolidate and enforce his power. He first instructs them to chase Snowball from Animal Farm:

At this there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn. They dashed straight for Snowball, who only sprang from his place just in time to escape their snapping jaws.

They pursue Snowball across the farm and almost catch him. He escapes but dares not return, so Napoleon is able to become all powerful. Snowball, Napoleon's only real rival, is intelligent, dedicated and resourceful, but no match for Napoleon's willingness to employ raw force.

When the hens protest having to lay 400 eggs a week, Napoleon cuts off their food supply and decrees any animal giving them so much as a grain of corn should be put to death. This threat of violence works and the hens eventually capitulate.

Napoleon also uses the violence in his show trials. He has the three hens who were the ringleaders in protesting the increased egg quota confess that they were incited by Snowball in a dream to disobey Napoleon's orders. Napoleon has the three hens, "slaughtered," along with some other animals who also confess to having been led astray by Snowball. This demoralizes and frightens the rest of the animals, who creep off, "shaken and miserable." 

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