How did Jackie Robinson influence the people of his time and what was his part in the civil rights movement?

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Being the first African American to play Major League Baseball was very influential. He experienced extreme racism, especially in the Southern towns. Through this all, he kept his composure and wasn't a very public figure. This perseverance was an influence on other minorities to stand up not only in sports...

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Being the first African American to play Major League Baseball was very influential. He experienced extreme racism, especially in the Southern towns. Through this all, he kept his composure and wasn't a very public figure. This perseverance was an influence on other minorities to stand up not only in sports but in society as a whole. His timing was effective because it was right on the spark of the future Civil Rights Movement.

After he retired in 1957, Robinson became much more involved in the Civil Rights Movement. He chaired a program in the NAACP. He worked with Martin Luther King Jr. with a youth movement. Robinson also pressured the MLB to start boycotting Southern towns that were lagging behind in segregation. Robinson was a huge proponent of using economic punishments to spur on integration.

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Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in major league baseball, at the time the most high-profile professional sport. Robinson was sought out by Branch Rickey, the general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, who had decided that he wanted his club to feature the first African-American player. Robinson, previously a star in the Negro Leagues, was chosen because of his background (he was college-educated) and because he persuaded Rickey that he could endure the threats and name-calling that he would receive.

Robinson not only survived the threats with dignity, but he became one of the best players of his era, helping lead the Dodgers to six pennants in the 1940s, and was the National League MVP in 1979. After his retirement, Robinson became an advocate for civil rights, and wrote a book, Baseball Has Done It, which exposed the discrimination that black players continued to receive throughout the 50s and 60s. By breaking the color line, he achieved a major symbolic and inspirational victory for African Americans.

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