How did industrialization change society and peoples' lives?

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Industrialization has had both positive and negative consequences for people. Industrialization creates jobs for people with various levels of skills. Industrialization also allows for the rapid production of cheap goods. This creates a consumer culture that will continually produce and consume as long as supplies of money and supplies exist.

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Industrialization has had both positive and negative consequences for people. Industrialization creates jobs for people with various levels of skills. Industrialization also allows for the rapid production of cheap goods. This creates a consumer culture that will continually produce and consume as long as supplies of money and supplies exist.

Industrialization also has negative consequences for people. Industrialization's mass production techniques put many craftsmen out of business and it has led to the loss of artisan jobs where a person would have to know how to make something from start to finish. While industrialization employs many people, these people often work in unsafe conditions for poverty wages unless they have some protection against business owners. Industrialization's level of consumerism also leads to increases in environmental exploitation. People are often affected by the side-effects of industrialization in countries without restrictions against industrialists.

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Industrialization made a huge impact on people's lives primarily because of the ways it changed the needs of the rich to control and access labor. The massive need for unskilled and low-wage labor led business owners to build housing specifically for their workers, and then they used grand promises to encourage people to move into cities without connections or a way to live outside of these company houses, fearing eviction if they lose their jobs. This increased the number of urban poor and led to the creation of poor houses and the expansion of criminalization in order to control these populations when they weren't being productive enough. These factors also exaggerated and, for many people, created the separation between home life and work life, which also increased people's dependence on their work by weakening family connections. These changes still affect the structure of work and living today.

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The industrialization of the world changed the manner in which people lived and the way societies interacted in a variety of ways including quality of life, economic power and political repercussions.  The landscape of the world morphed from a primarily agrarian culture to mechanical.  The new industrialization required people to re-think the cultural norms and challenge the government to adapt to the new way of life as well.

Industrialization changed society from agrarian to mechanical, meaning the majority of sustainable jobs moved to larger cities.  This created several problems for the working class.  Living conditions during the early phases of industrialization were poor.  Cities, unable to handle the influx of workers, hastily erected poorly constructed and crowded apartment buildings or other residences.  The workers often lived close to the factories and were surrounded by pollution more often than not.  The work was also dangerous with little government oversight on new industries.  Workers, having yet to form unions, had little bargaining power with managers leaving the workers vulnerable to unsafe conditions.

However, as industrialization's problems were addressed through regulation and natural social reform it also allowed for the expansion of a middle class in America.  The agrarian society had either farmers, often struggling financially or skilled persons of wealth with a narrow middle class.  Industrialization expanded the middle class as workers could become skilled or semi-skilled in industry.  Competition among factories also allowed moderate skill workers to move easier providing a measure of economic independence.

The middle class had the benefit of expendable income for many.  This was used more for entertainment and comfort than ever before, creating a new consumer demand driven market.  New technologies also gave the working class more free time.  The free time and closer association with neighbors drove the creation of the entertainment industry as a viable market.  The darker side of the growing population in cities was racial tension and gang violence.

Industrialization brought wealth to society.  Trade and manufacture became increasingly important on a global scale.  Consumer demand for products, brought on by higher wages and expendable income, fueled the cycle increasing financial gains for the economy.  This came with a huge learning curve in the United States when the Great Depression occurred following the fall of the stock market in October 1929.  Investors had failed to realize the magnitude of the financial markets and the world paid a heavy price.

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