How did the Indians fare under President Jackson's administration?

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Andrew Jackson was President of the United States from 1829 to 1837. During his presidency, life for Native Americans considerably worsened.

Jackson believed in a policy of Indian removal. It was his intention to evict Indians from their homelands and force them to resettle in lands west of the Mississippi...

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Andrew Jackson was President of the United States from 1829 to 1837. During his presidency, life for Native Americans considerably worsened.

Jackson believed in a policy of Indian removal. It was his intention to evict Indians from their homelands and force them to resettle in lands west of the Mississippi River. To bring this about, he ignored the then-current laws and Supreme Court decisions. Within a year of assuming the presidency, he signed the Indian Removal Act, which allowed the federal government to seize Indian land east of the Mississippi and exchange it for land to the west.

President Jackson ignored federal law that granted the Cherokee people millions of acres of land in Georgia, and instead allowed Georgia to confiscate the land. In doing this, he turned a blind eye to a US Supreme Court decision that clearly stated that Georgia had no claim to Native American lands.

The Indian Removal Act forced thousands of Choctaw, Creek, Cherokee, and other tribes to forsake their ancestral lands and move west—amidst incredible hardship. Thousands died during these involuntary journeys. This forced relocation became known as the "Trail of Tears" and continued for a significant time after Jackson's presidency. Even the land that the Indians were promised west of the Mississippi continually shrank due to the encroachment of white settlers.

In conclusion, we can say that Indians fared very poorly under President Andrew Jackson's presidency. He left a legacy that was characterized by oppression of and death for Native Americans.

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American Indians did not fare well under Andrew Jackson’s administration, as his policies removed them from their homelands upon the signing of the Indian Removal Act. During the forced removal campaign, as many as 15,000 Indians died when the government relocated them to the west side of the Mississippi River to make way for white settlers. The notorious Trail of Tears left 4,000 Cherokee dead from such factors as disease and starvation.

Andrew Jackson used the full authority of the US government to remove Indians by force. Jackson’s treatment of Indians was a departure from previous policies, where Indians enjoyed some protections that allowed them to keep their lands, and the law required peaceful negotiation when it came to land removal. Before Jackson, officials also forced Indians to convert to Christianity and assimilated them into the dominant culture. However, Jackson cared little about assimilation. His policies contributed to the removal of most Indians from the southeast by the end of the 1830s.

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For Native Americans in the South and the Midwest, Andrew Jackson's presidency (and indeed his entire career in public life) was a total disaster. Jackson made a name for himself as an Indian fighter during the War of 1812 and the Creek and Seminole Wars, and when he became President, a major priority of his was removing the Native peoples of the Southeast to "Indian Territory" in modern-day Oklahoma. He authorized the states to conclude treaties with natives within their borders, which some tribes, or more accurately some factions within some tribes, agreed to under duress. Those who did not agree were forced from their lands by whites who, encouraged by Jackson's aggressive stance, staked their claims. The Cherokee, angry at this treatment, challenged the actions of the state of Georgia in the Supreme Court, but when the Court ruled in their favor, Jackson ignored the decision, and instructed his advisors to continue to enforce removal. The process included even after Jackson's presidency, with the Cherokee embarking on the disastrous "Trail of Tears" in 1838. Through Jackson's policies, the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole were almost entirely driven from their lands by 1840. 

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