How did Huck grow emotionally throughout the novel?

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Another way that Huck grows throughout the novel is in his views on society and being 'civilized'. At the beginning of the novel, Huck's objections to society revolve mainly around things like having to dress properly, going to school, having to stay clean, and being proper. These things are fairly superficial, and his objections are simply the personal preferences of a pre-teen boy. As the novel progresses, however, Huck is exposed to some very difficult circumstances, and his views of society grow and mature as a result.

Huck watches as Sherburn shoots Boggs, and he listens to Sherburns speech about how cowardly most of society is. He sits in a tree and becomes nauseous as he watches the Sheperdsons kill off the Grangerford clan, including his young friend Buck. And Huck observes as over and over the King and the Duke manipulate and con innocent, naive members of society. As the King and Duke are tarred, feathered, and rode out on a rail, Huck declares that people sure can be cruel to...

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