How did Greek geography affect the development of Greek trade, culture and other aspects of their civilization?

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Greece contains both coastal land and islands. Its location is central to the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas. Greece's geography is advantageous for a number of reasons. First, the coastal land is excellent for fishing and trade. Greece built up a storehouse of grains and fish which supported the population. Fish...

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Greece contains both coastal land and islands. Its location is central to the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas. Greece's geography is advantageous for a number of reasons. First, the coastal land is excellent for fishing and trade. Greece built up a storehouse of grains and fish which supported the population. Fish and seafood became staple goods for consumption and for commerce. Secondly, trade between the coastal mainland and the islands facilitated the exchange of basic goods as well as exotic or luxury items. Greece became the center of major trade routes connecting the East and the West. Greece also developed a class of sailor-merchants that would go out trading on nearby islands.

The Greek islands facilitated not only the trade of goods but also the trade of knowledge and culture. There was a great deal of cultural, linguistic, and intellectual exchange, particularly on the island of Crete. All these factors combined to make Greece a cultural and intellectual center of the ancient world.

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