The New Deal Questions and Answers

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How did the federal government change during the New Deal?

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President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal programs substantially increased the size of the federal government while simultaneously greatly expanding the government's role in the daily lives of much of the populace.

While the Constitution of the United States established the structures, roles, and responsibilities of the federal government, it allowed the possibility of the government's expansion in the years following ratification. With expansion came the increase in the federal government's powers—a development possibly anathema to the ideas of limited government, which, ultimately, the New Deal and future president Lyndon Johnson's 1960s-era "Great Society" essentially supplanted. 

Prior to the onset of the Great Depression, the catalyst for the New Deal programs that were created during the 1930s, the size of the federal government was fairly limited. The catastrophic consequences of the depression, however, required measures that were unique to the situation. However, these...

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