How did the English view the “New World”?

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Although the New World was discovered in the late 15th century by explorers primarily searching for efficient ocean trade routes, the possibility of colonizing new lands was met with growing enthusiasm among several empires in Europe in the 16th century, including England.

By the end of this century, England and France both recognized...

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Although the New World was discovered in the late 15th century by explorers primarily searching for efficient ocean trade routes, the possibility of colonizing new lands was met with growing enthusiasm among several empires in Europe in the 16th century, including England.

By the end of this century, England and France both recognized the importance of seizing the opportunity to colonize the North American coast, as much of the Americas were predominantly claimed by Spain and Portugal. 

Aspirations for colonization spread across England during this period for various reasons. For the most part, colonization was viewed as a business venture by investors seeking to profit from acquired goods and materials. In addition, individuals of nobility sought the promise of property ownership in the New World, clergymen recognized the opportunity for evangelical missions, and common Englishmen sought to escape impoverished, overcrowded cities and make a fresh start.

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