How Did The Second New Deal Differ From The First

How did the so-called Second New Deal differ from the first?

Also, what political pressures did Roosevelt face that contributed to the new policies?

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The Second New Deal was closely connected to the prevailing political pressures facing FDR at the time. For one thing, the first New Deal hadn't made anywhere near enough of an impact on the nation's economy. Unemployment remained stubbornly high, businesses were still failing at an alarming rate, and the threat of another Depression seemed always just around the corner.

This led some to believe that FDR had been too cautious in his approach, too conservative in tackling the major structural problems in the American economy. The much more aggressive, more ostensibly liberal character of the second New Deal should be seen against this background. Although some, undoubtedly, supported the New Deal out of ideological conviction, FDR, for his part, remained something of a pragmatist. The point can be illustrated by the establishment of the WPA in 1935. The emphasis here was not on government competing for the creation of jobs with the private sector, but rather on rebuilding America's...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 849 words.)

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