How did the building of the transcontinental railroad and the Klondike gold rush bring about changes to the American West?

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Prior to these two events, the American West was generally an undeveloped region, inhabited primarily by native tribes and a few American prospectors. 

The completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869, however, brought dramatic changes to the west. Thousands of people headed to this region, especially immigrants, eager to explore...

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Prior to these two events, the American West was generally an undeveloped region, inhabited primarily by native tribes and a few American prospectors. 

The completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869, however, brought dramatic changes to the west. Thousands of people headed to this region, especially immigrants, eager to explore this new land and to find new opportunities. For the native tribes, this expansion created conflict and had some important consequences: by the 1880s, for examples, many tribes had been forcibly moved to reservations. 

The Klondike Gold Rush began in 1896 when three Indians found gold near Dawson in the remote area of Klondike in the Yukon. It took almost a year for word to spread but, once it did, over 100,000 Americans headed off to the Klondike to seek their fortune. Like the transcontinental railroad, the gold rush had huge consequences: Dawson, for example, was transformed from a tiny town to the largest city north of San Francisco. It was so important that it became the first city in Western Canada to have electric lighting and officially became a Canadian Province on June 13 1898. 

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