William Bradford Questions and Answers

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How did Bradford initially view the Native Americans?

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Bradford initially had a very negative view of the Native Americans, much like the majority of settlers in the early colonization period. He assumed that the Native Americans were savages without intellect, civilization, or morality. This viewpoint was helpful in justifying the actions of the settlers at the time, because they felt they were doing a godly service by living among the savages and showing them civilization, which gave them entitlement to the land and wealth of the region.

Over time, however, Bradford grew more respectful towards the Native Americans. His views began to shift from spending more time among them and seeing them learn English. He learned that they were not uncivilized or unintelligent, they simply had a different culture. In the end, this interaction was very beneficial because, through trade, the Native Americans helped provide necessary supplies to get the settlers through the winter.

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William Bradford was similar to many of the early settlers in that he viewed...

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