In To Kill a Mockingbird, what is Atticus Finch's attitude toward justice?

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As a lawyer, Atticus Finch firmly believes that every person who is a citizen of the United States is entitled to justice under the law regardless of any circumstances. Personally, he believes in impartiality, fair play, and respect for others.

Early in the narrative, Atticus talks with a disgruntled Scout about her first day of school and the complaints of her teacher, who is new to Maycomb. He tries to teach Scout to be fair in her judgment by imagining herself in Miss Caroline's place and then taking another "look" at what has happened her first day through the viewpoint of her teacher. In other words, Atticus suggests that Scout "climb into her skin and walk around in it." Later on, when Jem, Scout, and Dill Harris continue their efforts to communicate with Boo , Atticus surprises them one afternoon when he walks home to retrieve some papers. After he discovers that the children are still "putting his [Boo's] life's history on display for the . . . neighborhood," (Ch.5) Atticus is irate...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 921 words.)

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