How does Dickens present Scrooge's response to Marley's warnings in A Christmas Carol?

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Scrooge reacts with fear when he first encounters the ghost of his long-dead partner, Jacob Marley. Marley’s ghost appears for the first time as a glowing face on the doorknocker of Ebenezer Scrooge’s house. Scrooge is shaken by the apparition, but he unlocks the door, enters his house, and lights...

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Scrooge reacts with fear when he first encounters the ghost of his long-dead partner, Jacob Marley. Marley’s ghost appears for the first time as a glowing face on the doorknocker of Ebenezer Scrooge’s house. Scrooge is shaken by the apparition, but he unlocks the door, enters his house, and lights a candle. He examines the door before he closes it and tries to shake off his uneasiness. Scrooge is too cheap to light more candles, but he does check all the rooms in the house. Scrooge tries to begin his usual ritual of cooking the evening meal, but he continues to think about Marley’s face. When Marley’s ghost comes into the room, Scrooge examines him cautiously.

Scrooge admits to the apparition that he doesn’t believe in ghosts. Then he makes a joke, a practice that is unusual for the typically cranky Scrooge, but the joke is just an attempt to deflect his own attention from the rising fear he feels in the presence of Marley’s ghost. Scrooge is even more terrified when the ghost’s jaw drops to his chest after he unwraps the bandage from his head. Scrooge begs the ghost for comforting words. “I have none to give,” Marley says.

Marley then tells Scrooge that the only hope Scrooge has is to listen to the three Christmas ghosts who will soon visit him. Having experienced the horror of seeing his dead partner’s ghost, Scrooge says, “I think I’d rather not.” When he learns that the ghosts will arrive one at a time, Scrooge requests that they visit all at once because he dreads the experience and wants to get it over with. Marley’s ghost explains that the three apparitions will appear one at a time. Scrooge is exhausted from the experience and falls asleep immediately.

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The ghost of Jacob Marley, Scrooge's former business partner who died seven years before, appears before Scrooge in chains on the anniversary of his death. He tells Scrooge this same fate awaits him if he does not dedicate himself to his fellow men and women but instead only cares about making money. Scrooge makes many feeble defenses of Marley that he, Scrooge, would also apply to himself, including that Marley was a good man of business and that he was a good friend to Scrooge. To Scrooge's protestation that Marley was good at business, Marley replies, "Mankind was my business," intimating Scrooge should have dedicated himself to other people, not just to making money (23). Scrooge is clearly afraid of Marley's ghost, but he doesn't yet heed his message. After Marley leaves, Scrooge immediately goes back to sleep.

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