How to describe Jim's tone here in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?from Chapter 43, Tom give Jim forty dollars for being his prisoner. ... Jim said; "Dah, now, Huck, what I tell you? -- what I...

How to describe Jim's tone here in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?

from Chapter 43, Tom give Jim forty dollars for being his prisoner. ... Jim said;

"Dah, now, Huck, what I tell you? -- what I tell youup dah on Jackson's islan"? ....

 

He is jubilant, did he sound self-congratulatory?

Asked on by james2011

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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In Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, when Jim gets the forty dollars from Tom, I believe his is giving himself a pat on the back. Jim, as we have seen throughout the story, is extremely superstitious. He reminds Huck that he knew he would be rich again, and that he believes in signs—omens. He says:

Dah, now! doan' talk to me—signs is signs, mine I tell you...

Jim has really put up with a lot of nonsense and had his worries. He was frightened for Huck's life when he thought he'd lost Huck—but perhaps he has also recognized that Huck finally realized what a good friend Jim is. Tom's ridiculous adventures have especially inconvenienced Jim, and for a man whose fate has for so long not been in his hands, he has not only been delivered (alive) from Tom's machinations, but has also been proven correct about giving credence to signs along the way. Best of all, he has been rewarded in a way he could probably only dreamed of before—signs or no signs.

This small patch of "being right" would have been self-affirming to someone like Jim.

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