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The first time that Daisy and Gatsby met was five years prior to this story taking place.  Jordan Baker decribes how she came upon the couple one day in Louisville, KY, where she says that Gatsby was looking at Daisy "in a way that every young girl wants to...

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The first time that Daisy and Gatsby met was five years prior to this story taking place.  Jordan Baker decribes how she came upon the couple one day in Louisville, KY, where she says that Gatsby was looking at Daisy "in a way that every young girl wants to be looked at sometime" (chapter 4).  Gatsby was a lieutenant in the army, about to ship out for World War I, so their courtship was short. 

The next time they meet, Gatsby has asked Nick to arrange a tea for Daisy and Gatsby at Nick's house (chapter 5).  Whereas before, when they first met, there was an ease about them, this next meeting shows that both are uneasy:

Gatsby, his hands still in his pockets, was reclining against the mantelpiece in a strained counterfeit of perfect ease, even of boredom. His head leaned back so far that it rested against the face of a defunct mantelpiece clock, and from this position his distraught eyes stared down at Daisy, who was sitting, frightened but graceful, on the edge of a stiff chair.

Both characters do not know where this meeting will lead, and there has been five years between their last meeting, but Gatsby's entire dream rests on this meeting going well.  Nick comments at the end of chapter 5, "There must have been moments even that afternoon when Daisy tumbled short of his dreams — not through her own fault, but because of the colossal vitality of his illusion."  Because Gatsby believes that he can repeat the past, and because the reader knows that no one can rewind the clock five years, this meeting is the beginning of the end of Gatsby's illusion.

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