How is cytokinesis different in plants and animals?

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In terms of the end result, cytokinesis in plants and animals is the same. The cells that have been undergoing cell division through mitosis are now separated, and each cell is an individual cell with a complete set of DNA; however, cytokinesis is different between plant cells and animal cells....

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In terms of the end result, cytokinesis in plants and animals is the same. The cells that have been undergoing cell division through mitosis are now separated, and each cell is an individual cell with a complete set of DNA; however, cytokinesis is different between plant cells and animal cells. The reason for this is that plant cells have a cell wall in addition to their cell membrane. Animal cells do not have cell walls; therefore, cytokinesis can happen by having the cell membrane begin "pinching" inward. This pinching is called a cleavage furrow and is controlled by the cytoskeleton. The furrow will continue to deepen until it meets the membrane and fuses. At this point, the cell completely divides and forms two daughter cells. A plant cell can't do this pinching action because of the rigid cell wall. In this case a new wall, called a cell plate, is formed inside the cell. It will grow outward until two new cells are formed.

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