How are the crime control model and due process model alike?

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The crime control model and the due process model, while at fairly opposite ends of the criminal justice spectrum, are still rooted in an acceptance of punishment and incarceration. There are models of restorative and transformative justice that seek to abolish incarceration altogether. Because both of these models are still...

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The crime control model and the due process model, while at fairly opposite ends of the criminal justice spectrum, are still rooted in an acceptance of punishment and incarceration. There are models of restorative and transformative justice that seek to abolish incarceration altogether. Because both of these models are still rooted in the acceptance of incarceration, their approach is not that there should be a different manner in which harm is addressed, but rather, the difference is rooted in the intensity in which one seeks to use punishment. While the crime control model is indeed a harsher, more penalty-heavy model, both models apply the same basic principals of criminal justice. The due process model may seek to reform aspects of the criminal justice system, but it does not seek to radically transform the system, which would put it at odds with the crime control model.

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The only real similarity between these two visions of the criminal justice system is that both of them exist (according to Packer) within the general framework of the United States Constitution.

Packer argues that the two models are very close to opposite in their aims.  However, they both believe in and adhere to the standards set out in the Constitution.  For example, both models believe that the criminal justice system must operate within some set boundaries.  Not even the most avid backer of the crime control model would argue for a police state such as that of Nazi Germany -- one where there were no limits on what authorities may do.

So the major similarity is that both models accept the ideas of the US Constitution, even if they do not agree on exactly how those ideas should be applied.

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