In "Frankenstein", how does the creature convince Victor to make him a mate?

Expert Answers info

Jennings Williamson eNotes educator | Certified Educator

briefcaseTeacher (K-12)


calendarEducator since 2016

write6,739 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Arts

The creature tries to appeal to Victor's emotions as well as his sense of responsibility as a creator. The creature says,

I am thy creature, and I will be even mild and docile to my natural lord and king if thou wilt also perform thy part, the which thou owest me. Oh, Frankenstein, be not equitable to every other and trample upon me alone, to whom thy justice, and even thy clemency and affection, is most due. Remember that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded.

In other words, the creature describes himself as a victim. He implies that Victor, his creator, has dealt fairly with everyone else in his life except the creature. The creature claims that Victor owes him the chance to be happy. In fact, he claims that Victor owes him mercy and affection because he is his maker. He appeals to Victor as to a god, perhaps stroking his ego a bit, saying...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 660 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

charcunning eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2008

write224 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and Law and Politics

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

timbrady eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2007

write857 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

check Approved by eNotes Editorial