How could I separate a mixture of salt and sugar?

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Separating a mixture of salt and sugar is actually quite easy. Athough sugar is soluble in any type of alcohol, salt on the other hand is not. If you want to separate the two, first mix both salt and sugar in any type of alcoholic beverage. Once you do that, if you now filter the beverage, you will be able to obtain the salt. However, since the sugar is soluble in alcohol, you need to obtain it in a different manner.

Once you have filtered the beverage and gotten the salt, evaporating the alcohol and sugar mixture will leave you with the sugar. After both filtering then evaporating, you will be left with the separation of sugar and salt that you started with.

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If it is a dry mixture, then you can use 100% alcohol which will dissolve the sugar, but not the salt (which can be filtered off).  The alcohol has to be evaporated to yield the sugar.

If they are mixed in water, then you could try reducing the volume by boiling, but not too long in case one or other comes out of solution.  Addition of an excess of acetone to the solution shouldl precipitate the salt, which can be filtered off.  Evaporation of the acetone will yield the sugar.  An alternative is to mix vigorously with toluene, which will dissolve the sugar but not the salt, and separate the layers using a separating funnel (as the toluene does not mix with water).

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This is a very easy answer. Sugar is soluble in alcohols while salt is not. Simply mix the two in alcohol and filter the solution to get the salt. Then evaporate the alcohol sugar mixture and you will be left with the sugar. Done.

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