How could I explain the following quote from Julius Caesar, when Casca states: "Oh, he sits high in all the people’s hearts, And that which would appear offense in us, His countenance, like...

How could I explain the following quote from Julius Caesar, when Casca states:

"Oh, he sits high in all the people’s hearts,

And that which would appear offense in us,

His countenance, like richest alchemy,

Will change to virtue and to worthiness."?

Asked on by sj37136

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accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This quote is taken from Act I scene 3, and is delivered by Casca, who talks about the need that the conspirators have to win Brutus over to their cause. This is because, As Casca explains, Brutus enjoys such a good reputation in the people of Rome and is thought of so highly and considered to be so honourable by them. This means he will add legitimacy to the cause of the conspirators. Casca ironically says that if Brutus does something that Casca and Cassius would do, Brutus would get away with it, because what he does has the appearance of looking virtuous. Cassius recognises the truth of what Casca says when he comments:

Him and his worth and our great need of him
You have right well conceited.
 
The conspirators have a "great need" of Brutus therefore because having him on their side will help win the support of the people to the new leaders of Rome when they have assassinated Caesar.
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maria-vivanco's profile pic

maria-vivanco | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

This quote refers to Brutus. The conspirators feel that Brutus has his way with people and people trust him. If he was part of the conspirators, then the people wouldn't see their act (killing Caesar) as bad as they would see it it if Brutus wasn't part of it. Him being part of it would give them advantage with the crowd. 

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