How could I apply Marxist theory to a passage in "Araby"?

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There are several passages in James Joyce's "Araby" that might be interpreted according to Marxist literary theory. Let's review the basics about Marxist theory and then take a look at some possible passages.

Marxist theory looks at literature through the lens of class struggle and oppression. It...

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There are several passages in James Joyce's "Araby" that might be interpreted according to Marxist literary theory. Let's review the basics about Marxist theory and then take a look at some possible passages.

Marxist theory looks at literature through the lens of class struggle and oppression. It focuses on economics, politics, and social class divisions and tries to determine what a literary work reveals about these elements. Marxist criticism makes a special attempt to explore how a culture and its social institutions oppress the poor (and how the poor overcome such oppression), and it keeps a close watch for ruling-class propaganda in literature.

Now let's turn our attention to "Araby." The narrator lives with his aunt and uncle in what seems to be a middle-class neighborhood. The family moves into an "uninhabited house" at the end of the street. The passage describing the neighborhood and the house might be a prime one for a Marxist analysis, for it hints at an underlying class division that might separate the narrator for the other people in the neighborhood.

You might also focus in on the narrator's promise to bring Mangan's sister something from the Araby bazaar. His uncle forgets to take him but gives him some money anyway and allows him to go on his own. The scenes at the bazaar provide another good option for a Marxist interpretation. Look closely at how the vendor treats the narrator, and note how there are men counting money and how the narrator cannot find anything that he wishes (or perhaps can afford) to buy. He leaves the bazaar in anguish without buying anything.

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