How is constitutional monarchy different from an absolute monarchy?

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There are differences between an absolute monarchy and a constitutional monarchy. In an absolute monarchy, the monarch has total power. The monarch can make laws, determine if a war will occur, and handle relations with other countries. The monarch is not elected and power usually remains within the monarch’s family for...

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There are differences between an absolute monarchy and a constitutional monarchy. In an absolute monarchy, the monarch has total power. The monarch can make laws, determine if a war will occur, and handle relations with other countries. The monarch is not elected and power usually remains within the monarch’s family for many generations.

In a constitutional monarchy, the power of the monarchy is limited. In some cases, the role of the monarch may be ceremonial. In a constitutional monarchy, the citizens of the country elect leaders to make laws. The head of the lawmaking branch is also elected and holds real political power. For example, Great Britain has a constitutional monarchy. The Parliament makes the laws. The members of House of Commons are elected, and the Prime Minister comes from the majority party in the House of Commons.  The Queen appoints the members of the House of Lords. The Prime Minister holds real political power. The role of Queen Elizabeth is mainly a ceremonial role. In a constitutional monarchy, the monarch’s power is limited by a constitution, unlike in an absolute monarchy where no constitution exists.

There are differences between an absolute monarchy and a constitutional monarchy.

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