How conflict is necessary for change to take place, as seen in The Crucible?

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Conflict is necessary for change based upon the fact that conflict exists when two people (or one against a group/ group against a group) do not see eye to eye on a specific issue. Essentially, without the presence of conflict, everyone is happy and satisfied with what is going on...

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Conflict is necessary for change based upon the fact that conflict exists when two people (or one against a group/ group against a group) do not see eye to eye on a specific issue. Essentially, without the presence of conflict, everyone is happy and satisfied with what is going on in their lives and around them.

Therefore, the conflict portrayed in Arthur Miller's play "The Crucible" is necessary in order to see that the village, the village's officials, and the ideology of the village changes.

For example, if John Proctor would not have been having problems with his wife, Elizabeth, he would not have had an affair. His coming clean about the affair brought about change in their relationship.

Another example which shows the necessity of conflict in regards to change is the lack of trust between the villagers of Salem. Give all of the accusations arising from previous feuds, the conflict which arose during the trials proved to be more than simple accusations of witchcraft. In the end, it does come out that people were using accusations to "solve" their disputes.

One final example of conflict's place in insuring change is the conflict which arises between Abigail and John. John, not wanting to be involved with Abigail any longer, calls her out in court as a "whore." Without their prior adulterous relationship (conflict), the courts would not be aware of the alternative reasons she may be using to make accusations against others.

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