In Persepolis, how can I compare Marjane's life in Iran and in Austria through the panels using the technique, tone and theme? 

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The graphic novel Persepolis is set in Iran and Austria. It is a coming of age story that explains the cultural differences between Iran and the West. Marjane, the main character, has the familiarity and comfort of her own culture in Iran, despite the ongoing war.

The scenes set inside...

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The graphic novel Persepolis is set in Iran and Austria. It is a coming of age story that explains the cultural differences between Iran and the West. Marjane, the main character, has the familiarity and comfort of her own culture in Iran, despite the ongoing war.

The scenes set inside her home show moments of solace and love with her family. She is shown often having deep conversations with her parents and friends. She is also shown relaxing, reading, writing, and being surrounded by her grandma and uncle. Outside of her home, the streets of Iran portray chaos and violence. On the streets of Iran she is alert, nervous, and guarded. Marjane is forced to keep her hair covered and is stopped by authorities many times for acting indecently.

When Marjane is sent to Austria, she is a young teenager in the midst of figuring herself out. While she does not like the repressive culture of Iran, she recognizes it as home. In Austria she is put outside of her comfort zone and is thrown into Western culture. Her time there quickly unravels as she loses herself in the drug culture and sexual promiscuity of the West. The artist draws her as more worn down, tired, and at times crazy. Marjane experiences homelessness, and the panels take a dark turn with more shading and shadows.

When Marjane returns to Iran, she continues to experience depression; however, the tone of the comic changes. The lighting is brighter and Marjane once again has thoughtful and challenging conversations with her family.

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I think it's fair to say that she had fewer self-doubts as a little girl in the militantly repressive Iran than she had in the unstructured, unrestrained West. It's tempting to say that one thing might be connected to the other; maybe rebelling against the Religious Police gave her a sense of confidence and structure she was missing when sleeping outside in the parks of Vienna.

On the other hand, as a little girl, she had a strong family watching her back and when she lived in Austria, they were far away. But don't all small children feel immortal, and aren't all adults afraid? The paramilitaries that oppressed her also, in a way, watched out for her and in Austria, nobody did.

As a kid, she had a hijab and a Walkman, and they were almost connected. In Austria, she had neither and was all the more vulnerable for it. She always acted tough as nails, but as she got older realized it was just an act.

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