How does the community of Sighet view Eliezer's father in the novel Night by Elie Wiesel?

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In Night by Elie Wiesel , Eliezer's father is treated with great respect by their community of Sighet. Wiesel writes, "The Jewish community of Sighet held him in highest esteem; his advice on public and even private matters was frequently sought" (Wiesel, 4). After the town is occupied by the...

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In Night by Elie Wiesel, Eliezer's father is treated with great respect by their community of Sighet. Wiesel writes, "The Jewish community of Sighet held him in highest esteem; his advice on public and even private matters was frequently sought" (Wiesel, 4). After the town is occupied by the Germans and edicts begin falling on the Jewish community, people still seek his advice. "Some prominent members of the community came to consult with my father, who had connections at the upper levels of the Hungarian police; they wanted to know what he thought of the situation" (11). After the ghettos were erected in Sighet, the Jews formed organizations to deal with the day to day happenings of the "new" community. These organizations included a police force and a special council. Eliezer's father was appointed to the council, a position of importance. A man who is obviously respected in his own community could not possibly have envisioned the way he was to be treated upon arrival at Auschwitz. Wiesel describes the admiration of others for his father in such detail in the opening pages of the book, which magnifies the stark contrast of his harsh treatment in the camps.

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