How CO2 and H2O get to the photosynthesising cell?

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Carbon Dioxide gets into plant cells through small holes in the leaves called stomates (stomata). Water for the most part is absorbed into the roots (vascular plants) and then transported throughout the plant in a sort of plumbing system called the xylem. If it is a nonvascular plant, it is probably rather small and living nearby or in the water and simply absorbs it through its tissues. Here are two links with simple diagrams.

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There are many different types of cells.  Many animals have skeletons to give their body structure and support.  Plants do not have a skeleton for support and yet plants don't just flop over in a big spongy mess.  This is because of a unique cellular structure called the cell wall.  The cell wall is a rigid structure outside of the cell membrane composed mainly of the polysaccharide cellulose.  The cell wall gives the plant cell a defined shape which helps support individual parts of plants.  In addition to the cell wall, plant cells contain an organelle called the chloroplast.  The chloroplast allows plants to harvest energy from sunlight.  Specialized pigments in the chloroplast (including the common green pigment chlorophyll) absorb sunlight and use this energy to complete the chemical reaction:

 6 CO2 + 6 H2O + energy (from sunlight) = C6H12O6 + 6 O2

In this way, plant cells manufacture glucose and other carbohydrates that they can store for later use.

I hope this answers your question, I was not sure what you were asking.  For more information check the links below and maybe read about the Calvin cycle.

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