How are the children in Scout's classroom a miniature version of their fathers (with reference to the events in which their fathers appear)?  Show that this is especially true of Scout, Burris...

How are the children in Scout's classroom a miniature version of their fathers (with reference to the events in which their fathers appear)?

 

Show that this is especially true of Scout, Burris Ewell and Walter Cunningham from the whole book.

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bullgatortail eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Unfortunately, we don't get to find out much about Scout's other classmates in To Kill a Mockingbird. Scout and Jem don't really seem to have a lot of close schoolmates, since they spend most of their time together or with Dill. Little Chuck Little is certainly a fascinating youngster: A gentlemanly little guy, he stands up to Burris Ewell when Miss Caroline is threatened, reaches into his pocket for a knife, and tells Burris that "I'd soon's kill you as look at you." We can only guess that his father may be similar to Mr. Cunningham with his hard-edged but honest nature. Cecil Jacobs is also not explored in great depth. The boy who surprises Jem and Scout on the way to the Halloween pageant, we only find out that he is a practical joker and that he lives next door to the post office.

pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Both of these kids are like their fathers.

Burris Ewell is dirty and angry, just like his father.  He hates authority, just like his father.  He calls the teacher a slut as he is leaving school on the first day.  His father spits on Atticus.

Walter Cunningham is like his father.  He will not take charity for lunch when he has no money.  He is clean and will do his best.  His father pays Atticus for doing legal work for him, even though it takes him a while and he has to pay some of it in kind.

 

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To Kill a Mockingbird

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