How is the character of Piggy developed in Lord of the Flies?Piggy's character seems quite static compared with the other boys in the novel. He keeps his civilised values and his hopes of rescue....

How is the character of Piggy developed in Lord of the Flies?

Piggy's character seems quite static compared with the other boys in the novel. He keeps his civilised values and his hopes of rescue. So his character develops because those of the other boys change - he is in ever greater contrast to them. Is this a reasonable view? Or are there ways in which he changes too?

Asked on by lostboy

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Interestingly, I think that in order to answer this question, we need to consider the allegorical nature of this novel and the way that the various characters each reflect some larger idea of aspect. Piggy, as his frequent discoveries and inventions show, represents scientific rationalism and civilisation. One aspect of allegorical novels is that, because the characters each represent some form of vice or virture, there is little opportunity for them to develop as characters, as their function is more allegorical. This is certainly the case with Piggy. From the very start of the novel, he is the one that tries to create a system of rules and regulations and then slavishly adheres to them, as is shown when he tries to make his voice heard and insists that the other boys listen to him because he was holding the conch.

Because he represents civilisation and scientific rationalism, he does act as a foil to the rest of the boys. As they sink into ever greater depths of degradation, it is clear that Piggy stays the same and clings on to the values and principles of civilisation, thus making their savagery seem all the more dire. Piggy is therefore a static character.

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