How can you sympathize with Miss Emily in the story "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner?

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It is always poignant when one's world comes to an end.  Afterall, a person is a product of one's cultural, social, and spiritual mores. Having these eradicated by a new world leaves a person isolated and alone; a part of this person dies along with the world he/she once knew, especially...

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It is always poignant when one's world comes to an end.  Afterall, a person is a product of one's cultural, social, and spiritual mores. Having these eradicated by a new world leaves a person isolated and alone; a part of this person dies along with the world he/she once knew, especially if there is no one with whom to, at least, share memories. 

Also touching  is the dignity displayed by Emily in her persistence in the past world.  She seeks no sympathy, she begs no one to call upon her after all is lost. 

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As a never-married southern woman who was very attached to her late father and who values privacy and being alone--absolutely. However much I wanted to deny my father's death, I didn't try to keep his body. And I don't have a dead Yankee turning into a mummiy in my spare bedroom. Even so, I'm glad I don't have nosy neighbors constantly gossiping about my every movement.

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Miss Emily was rejected by her love interest!  Faulkner insinuates that Homer Baron was not interested in her.  That alone gives us grounds for sympathy, considering there are many of us that have felt that pain, and accompanying range of emotions-from anger to depression.  This rejection, in combination with her secluded lifestyle, the town's constant gossiping and judging of her, and the death of her father are all grounds for sympathy.

However-does any of the above justify poisoning the guy who rejected you and sleeping next to his corpse for years on end?  I should hope not--that's just creepy, AND why this story is so interesting!   :)

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