How can we tie in White Noise to today's pop culture, and what is DeLillo's point about "the most photographed barn in america"?

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White Noise is a world built upon the logics of "simulacra," to use a term originally coined by philosopher Jean Baudrillard. The novel's world is full of simulations, copies, and reproductions. The main characters in the novel must engage in simulated evacuations, provided by SIMUVAC, a new state program, to...

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White Noise is a world built upon the logics of "simulacra," to use a term originally coined by philosopher Jean Baudrillard. The novel's world is full of simulations, copies, and reproductions. The main characters in the novel must engage in simulated evacuations, provided by SIMUVAC, a new state program, to practice for real emergencies.

The idea of a simulated world is important in the context of Jack and Murray, who live in a society where people prefer the tabloid version of life over reality. Murray notes that when camera-wielding tourists visit "The Most Photographed Barn" in America," complete with bands who play live "Muzak," they are not after a "real" experience. They already do not see the barn for what it really is. Tourists do not see the "real" barn anymore, but only the simulated one—which they think is real.

In reference to current pop culture, the world of advertising has never been stronger. Like De Lillo's world of White Noise with the "incessant clicking of shutter release buttons" that permeates the Most Photographed Barn in America, the Western Hemisphere continues to champion consumer culture through the endless buzz of commercials for brand-name items. If White Noise represents the triumph of late capitalism, then we, too, live in the "white noise" of consumer culture. Popular culture largely demands we give in to the noise.


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