How can I prove Brave New World speaks of a Marxist Society? I am to talk about Karl Marx and his theories and relate it to Brave New World.

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Marxian theory is basically a critique of the system of laissez-faire capitalism that existed in the industrialized countries of nineteenth-century Europe. Marx believed the system was inherently flawed and that eventually a revolution of the workers would take place, supplanting the rule of the owner class of his own time...

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Marxian theory is basically a critique of the system of laissez-faire capitalism that existed in the industrialized countries of nineteenth-century Europe. Marx believed the system was inherently flawed and that eventually a revolution of the workers would take place, supplanting the rule of the owner class of his own time with the rule of the proletariat—the working people who actually created the products of the industrial world, and the peasants who farmed the land.

Huxley's Brave New World does not depict the kind of society Marx believed would eventually be created. In fact, one could say his dystopia is the opposite of a Marxian one, because it is based on a genetically engineered caste system in which in vitro fertilization is done on a mass level, the intention being to breed humans with specific characteristics and levels of intelligence. This is a society in which inequality, rather than equality, is deliberately created.

If there is a connection between this and Marx, it lies in the fact that Huxley's imagined future, like that envisioned by Marx, is a post-capitalist world. Instead of rulership by an owner class, Huxley depicts a state-run society in which scientists and geneticists are managing the world. Capitalism has been destroyed, as Marx predicted it would be, but "socialism" has not replaced it, unless by socialism we mean any kind of society in which there is state control and there is no private ownership, even if the equality of all men that Marx envisioned does not occur.

The other great dystopian writer of the first half of the twentieth century, George Orwell, was influenced by Huxley and by the political scientist James Burnham, whose 1941 book, The Managerial Revolution, predicts the demise of capitalism and its replacement by "managerialism," a system in which the traditional role of the owner class is carried out by specialists: scientists, engineers, accountants, economists, and so on—the new "managerial" class. As with Huxley's "brave new world," this is not Marxism, but it has in common with Marxian theory the demise of capitalism and its replacement by another system. The same is true of Orwell's 1984, and its negative utopia of total state control and quasi-enslavement of the entire population save for the Inner Party (a small elite which are Orwell's equivalent of Huxley's genetic planners and Burnham's managerial class). Unfortunately, in today's actual twenty-first century world, we can see that some elements of each of these dystopian writer's predictions are beginning to be fulfilled.

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While I agree with the answer above, and more broadly, with the idea that it is difficult to try to fit the world of Brave New World neatly into a Marxist paradigm, there are some parallels with Marxism.

First, Marxism calls for a system of state ownership of the means of production. This is how the World State is run, in order to maximize efficiency. This futuristic state simply doesn't contain myriad private businesses chaotically and energetically competing for money. Instead, the state decides what to make and what people should consume. The state even has laws dictating that no new sport created may use less equipment than the sports already in existence. Because of state control of factories and resources, as well as state control of child-rearing, people can be conditioned to desire what the state wants them to consume.

Marxism also wanted to break up the traditional Victorian patriarchal structure of the family so as to liberate women from the tyranny of unpaid labor. The World State has abolished the family, and all the women do work.

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In your explanation here, you say that you have to relate Marx's theories to the book.  I would say that you should do this by saying that this society shows what Marx says is wrong with capitalist society.  This society is not marxist.  Instead, it is the epitome of what Marx is criticizing.

To Marx, capitalist society has the upper classes dominating the lower.  In this society, this has been taken to an extreme.  The upper classes (the Alphas) create these castes of slaves to do their work.  To Marx, religion is used to prevent the masses from rebelling.  In this book, conditioning, sports, soma, and sex are used for the same purpose.  When you look at it like this, you can see that Marx would say that this society is like capitalism, only worse.

A truly marxist society would have a population that is all equal.  This does not exist at all in this book.  So I would argue that you should relate Marx's theories to this book by saying that the book portrays a society that is a caricature of what Marx criticizes about capitalism.  It is meant to show what society ends up like if we take capitalism to its logical end.

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