how can I paraphrase of Randal Jarrell’s “The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner.” Is there anyone  to teach me  better paraphrasing ? thanks  how can I paraphrase of Randal Jarrell’s...

how can I paraphrase of Randal Jarrell’s “The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner.”

Is there anyone  to teach me  better paraphrasing ?

thanks

 

how can I paraphrase of Randal Jarrell’s “The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner.”

Is there anyone  to teach me  better paraphrasing ?

thanks

Asked on by adaletya

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amccammon's profile pic

amccammon | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

To paraphrase is to put something in your own works. Paraphrasing is NOT summarizing. You do not want to shorten the original text; you simply want to rephrase the text in more understandable terms. This should be done either line by line or sentence by sentence.

"The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner" is a relatively short poem by Randall Jarrell. The poem's speaker is a gunner on a WWII bomber who uses vivid imagery to describe a combat mission and the aftermath of his death.

The poem is only three sentences long. Each sentence begins with an adverbial phrase or clause that locates the speaker in a particular place or moment.

The words fell, hunched, and loosed indicate the speaker's sense of lack of control.

The first sentence tells of the speaker leaving home and going straight into being a soldier, indicated by the word State. The image of hunching in its belly is how the gunners crouched in the plexiglass sphere of the belly of the B-17 or B-24.

The second sentence locates the speaker six miles above the earth, which of course is in a plane. He describes being loosed from a dream of life - awoken from a dream - the opposite of life is death. He is awoken by the fire of anti-aircraft guns, which is the nightmare of all gunners like him.

The last sentece tells of the aftermath of the battle. He tells you outright that he died, and the final resolution is that his remains are washed out of the plane with a stem hose.

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