How can I compare and contrast Aslan and the White Witch in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe?  

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The White Witch is cunning, dishonest, proud, and arrogant. When she meets Edmund in the wood, she instantly realizes that, as a son of Adam, he can be useful to her but also is able to read Edmund's weaknesses and appeal to him in a manner that will ensure his...

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The White Witch is cunning, dishonest, proud, and arrogant. When she meets Edmund in the wood, she instantly realizes that, as a son of Adam, he can be useful to her but also is able to read Edmund's weaknesses and appeal to him in a manner that will ensure his loyalty. Her offer of Turkish Delight seems to offered in the spirit of hospitality but actually appeals to Edmund's desire for self gratification. While the spell on the candy is meant to bind him to the Witch, he is in a sense already on her side, as he shares her essential selfishness.

Aslan, on the other hand, is powerful and sometimes scary. Mr Beaver's description of him—"'Course he isn't safe! But he's good"—is contrasted with Edmund's experience with the White Witch, who seems to be nice but definitely isn't. Unlike the witch, Aslan exudes a kind of quiet confidence while at the same time recognizing the sacrifices that he will be required to make to keep Narnia safe.

His sacrifice to save Edmund is, of course, meant to evoke the Crucifixion but also underlines the key difference between himself and the White Witch. The witch is consumed with the need for power, but it is that desire which ultimately proves her downfall; Aslan, on the other hand, does in fact enjoy the power the witch craves but realizes that the source of that power lies in love and sacrifice.

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Aslan and the White Witch represent two opposing and powerful forces in The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. Aslan is the pure, gentle, brave, and all-knowing lion, who many readers believe represents Jesus Christ. Aslan is patient and kind, and willingly sacrifices his life for the good of his people, and to save the life of Edmond, who could be sentenced to death for being a traitor. The White Witch, while also incredibly powerful and cunning, is representative of evil, selfishness, temptation, and obsession with power. Upon meeting young and resentful Edmond, The White Witch quickly realizes that he can be used as a pawn in her battle to control all of Narnia, and to forever plunge the land in endless Winter and despair. Aslan, on the other hand, seeks to aid the children in becoming closer to one another, and sacrifices himself so that Edmond may live. Aslan, however, is able to see beyond his own suffering and knows that ultimately the Good in Narnia will prevail over the Evil. The White Witch is incredibly arrogant and fully confident that her ploy to control the land will prevail. When she does not succeed, her power is instantly diminished, for it is not rooted in love or any kind of enduring strength. Alsan's love and pureness is so powerful that he is able to rise from the dead after being executed by the White Witch, because his power is rooted in eternal love and goodness.

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Jadis, the White Witch, and Aslan, the lion, are both rulers (Aslan is the son of the emperor) ,but they couldn't otherwise be more different. Jadis uses her power to hurt others, while Aslan uses his power to help others.

The White Witch is the symbol of evil. The color white, as well the perpetual winter she keeps Narnia in, represent her coldness and desire for death. She is dishonest and deceptive, for instance, promising Edmund he will be king of Narnia, which is a lie, and luring him in with enchanted Turkish Delight candy. In the end, she turns on Edmund and shows her hard and terrifying side.

A lion, Aslan seems mighty and terrifying, but he is, in fact, the symbol of good, the Christ figure in the story. He has the real interests of the residents of Narnia at heart and brings springtime and new life to the land. He sacrifices himself to save Edmund, who doesn't deserve it, just as Jesus sacrificed himself to save or redeem an undeserving human race. Jadis, in contrast, cares only about herself and her own power, while Aslan cares about others more than himself.

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Aslan and the White Witch are characters from The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, the first of seven books in The Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis. In the larger story contained in this book, Aslan is the protagonist and Jadis the White Witch is the antagonist. Both Aslan and the White Witch are rulers, but their kingdoms are very different. The White Witch is only a pretender to the throne of Narnia. Aslan, as the Son of the Emperor, has true authority over Narnia as he seeks to install the proper human kings and queens, the “sons of Adam and the daughters of Eve.” The White Witch maintains Narnia in perpetual winter. As Aslan comes back to Narnia and is “on the move,” the frozen sham kingdom of the White Witch begins to thaw. The White Witch inspires fear and dread in her would-be subjects and is not above turning those who annoy her into stone. Aslan, in contrast, is good, fair, and trustworthy, and all of Narnia awaits his coming as he returns to set things to rights. Aslan’s coming is heralded by Father Christmas, which ultimately ushers in a lovely spring, bringing life back to Narnia, formerly made barren and dead by the White Witch’s perpetual winter. Whereas the White Witch demands the death of the traitor Edmund, Aslan ultimately gives his own blameless life for Edmund.

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