How can I decide which character I relate to most in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland?

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Every person will have a different answer to this question. A grandparent would not necessarily choose the same character as a grandchild and a professional athlete might empathize with a very different character than a nuclear physicist. Thus this answer will discuss a variety of character types we find in...

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Every person will have a different answer to this question. A grandparent would not necessarily choose the same character as a grandchild and a professional athlete might empathize with a very different character than a nuclear physicist. Thus this answer will discuss a variety of character types we find in the novel and will help readers think through developing personal answers.

The White Queen: Absent-minded, helpless, and chronically disorganized, the White Queen would be a good choice for someone who struggles with procrastination or with practical elements of everyday life. Most of us have White Queen moments, when we are running late for work, spill a cup of coffee over a white blouse, can't find our car keys, etc.

Alice: Intelligent, brave, and curious, Alice is the protagonist of the novel. Although at times she struggles to understand the adult world and is often unsure of herself, she is a decent and kind young woman.

The White Rabbit: The White Rabbit is the fashionista of Wonderland, concerned about his appearance. He is an aristocrat of Wonderland but constantly anxious and worried about being late. At times he can be pompous and autocratic but his main characteristic is trying to keep up appearances.

The Duchess: A thoroughly unpleasant character, The Duchess stands out for her "tough-love" approach to motherhood, singing as a lullaby:

Speak roughly to your little boy,

And beat him when he sneezes; . . .

The Cheshire Cat: Like all cats, he is clever and mysterious, appearing and disappearing according to his own whims. He enjoys gossip and has a delightful sense of humor, but prefers to observe and comment on the actions of the novel rather than get directly involved. Aspiring writers or journalists might empathize with this character.

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