How is Caesar's power indicated in scene two?

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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[I inadvertently entered the above answer before I had finished typing it. This is a continuation of that answer.]

Then near the end of Act 1, Scene 2, after Casca has nearly finished telling Cassius and Brutus about what Caesar being offered a crown or coronet by Mark Antony, Casca says:

I could tell you more news, too. Murellus and Flavius, for pulling scarves off Caesar's images, are put to silence.

This is an ominous indication of Caesar's power and the way he exercises it. No doubt it is not publicly announced that the two tribunes were murdered for showing disrespect, but they were just quietly eliminated by anonymous individuals following Caesar's orders. In the meantime Caesar himself is making a great display of his humility and lovable personality.

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In the first scene of Act 1 of Julius Caesar, the two tribunes Murellus and Flavius are shown going around the city removing the ornaments which some citizens have hung on statues in honor of Julius Caesar on the Feast of Lupercal. Flavius tells Murellus:

These growing feathers plucked from Caesar's wing
Will make him fly an ordinary pitch,
Who else would soar above the view of men
And keep us all in servile fearfulness.

Then near the end of Act 1, Scene 2, after Casca has nearly finished telling Cassius and Brutus about what Caesar being offered a crown or coronet by Mark Antony, Casca says:

 

 

 

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