How does Bud change in Chapter 4?  

As a victim of the Amos family, Bud goes to great lengths to protect himself from further harm. He lies in order to keep his new home, which is more like a prison than a place where he can feel safe. In chapter 4, he decides to flee the Amos family and run away for good. He decides not to return and live with other foster families because no one will ever love him as much as the Amos' son had. He realizes that being an orphan is something that happens over and over so he makes sure that Mrs. Amos will never get a new foster child who might be treated better than he was.

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In chapter 4, Bud has been victimized by the Amos family with cruel treatment for some time. As an orphan, he has been taught to be grateful and passive at this new home so that the family will keep him. Up until chapter 4, Bud follows these guidelines and tells adults, even those cruel to him, what they want to hear.

In this short chapter, however, the reader is introduced to a new Bud who will stand up for himself. Bud changes from a victim to a perpetrator of revenge and justice. He breaks out of the imprisoned situation in which the family had him. He decides to flee and never return to the orphanage. Lastly, he makes one gesture that is both revenge and a measure of protection. He creates a situation, acting in a way he has not before, where he can be sure to cause upset in the Amos family. He causes the Amos' son to wet the bed so that Mrs. Amos will see that her son is not perfect. He hopes that perhaps future foster children will not be as abused as he was by the Amos family because they now will see that their son and not the foster child is the cause of the household turmoil.

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