How do the band members feel about Bud? What strategies does the author use to help readers figure it out?

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Surprisingly, the band members (other than Calloway) are quite cordial and accepting of Bud. They might not be accepting of his notion that Calloway is his father, but the band members don't throw Bud out the door, either. They want to help him out. They can see that he is...

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Surprisingly, the band members (other than Calloway) are quite cordial and accepting of Bud. They might not be accepting of his notion that Calloway is his father, but the band members don't throw Bud out the door, either. They want to help him out. They can see that he is a young and hungry kid, and they know that he is quite determined to make it from Flint to Grand Rapids on his own. The band members decide to include Bud in their tight-knit group right away, and one way that the author shows readers this is by having the band invite Bud to eat with them:

"Bud" he said, "you look like you might be a little hungry, so I’ll tell you what we're going to do. We're all done rehearsing and were about to head over to the Sweet Pea. You're invited to come along . . ."

Sharing a meal with people is something that is fairly intimate. You invite friends and family members to share a meal. You invite co-workers whom you like to grab a meal with you. Most people do not invite strangers or enemies to a meal-sharing gathering. The other thing that the author has the band members do with Bud right from the start is kid around with him and tease him. Again, this helps establish the feeling of intimacy and friendship very quickly. It also shows that they like Bud. Nobody is trying to be intentionally mean to Bud, and nobody is trying to get rid of him right away.

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Once Bud finally makes his way to find Calloway and the band, the author made the decision to have the band members be the first people to accept Bud. Minutes after they meet him, they offer to take him to eat with them at a restaurant, even though they are still unsure of his true identity. The author uses friendly, familiar dialogue between Bud and the band members from the beginning. By describing the band members as approachable and providing many interactions between the band members and Bud, the author provides the reader with the knowledge that they are accepting of him. Eventually, they provide him with a band nickname like they have, which reinforces their acceptance of him.

As the plot continues to unfold, the author begins to describe Bud's mood as more positive and hopeful the more that he interacts with the band. This description of Bud and the tone of the text in these passages, help the reader know that the band members are sincere and are putting Bud at ease. In contrast, when Bud interacts with Mr. Calloway, the tone of the text is more tense as is Bud's mood. This helps add to the reader's understanding that Mr. Calloway has not yet accepted Bud. The contrast between Bud's interactions with the band and with Mr. Calloway highlights the band's acceptance of him.

 

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