How does Arthur Miller's play The Crucible invite audiences to consider the detrimental effects of a repressive society?

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A section of the Salem community was persecuted based on superstition, religion, and personal vendetta. The power of religion over the people and the enforcement of the religious code on the community by the authorities made the society a repressive one. Individuals had no choice with regards to religious practice....

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A section of the Salem community was persecuted based on superstition, religion, and personal vendetta. The power of religion over the people and the enforcement of the religious code on the community by the authorities made the society a repressive one. Individuals had no choice with regards to religious practice. They were expected to remain silent about their concerns on the administration of the church and religious practice in general. The people were also expected to go to church consistently, and failure led to suspicions of witchcraft. For instance, Hale suspected John after he unconvincingly responded to his questions about church attendance, his child’s baptism, and the Ten Commandments.

The author showed the detrimental effects of a repressive society by singling out the individuals who took advantage of the situation to forward and/or protect their interests. For instance, the issue of witchcraft was used by some individuals to get rid of their foes. Mr. Putnam used the situation to try and appropriate privately owned property by falsely accusing Giles. Judge Danforth failed to uphold justice and instead sought to protect his position. In conclusion, People in positions of power and those that can manipulate the situation have the last say in a repressive society.

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