How are the different dimensions to love shown in the novel Normal People?

Normal People shows the different dimensions to love by exploring the private love between Marianne and Connell and the impact of social circles and class differences on love. It also, through Marianne and Jamie, explores the abusive dimension of love and how family dynamics play into that. Finally, the novel explores what mature love looks like as Connell and Marianne discover they are strong enough to lead separate lives.

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In Normal People , Connell and Marianne experience various dimensions of love. As the book opens, for example, they experience love in both its private and public guises. At this point in the novel, Connell is a very popular figure in secondary school, while Marianne is awkward and unpopular. The...

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In Normal People, Connell and Marianne experience various dimensions of love. As the book opens, for example, they experience love in both its private and public guises. At this point in the novel, Connell is a very popular figure in secondary school, while Marianne is awkward and unpopular. The two get on well sleeping together and click together in private because they are both intelligent and insightful away from school, but in public, Connell is ashamed of Marianne. He hurts her, even though they have both agreed to keep the relationship secret, by asking another girl to the Debs. This part of the novel explores what the social face of love does to its private dimension

At Trinity College, the wealthy Marianne is the popular one who fits in, while Connell, the son of a cleaning lady, is awkward and feels out of place. This section explores how money and class can affect love. Connell doesn't want Marianne to feel he is using her money yet is jealous and uneasy when she dates the wealthy Jamie, whose father helped orchestrate the 2008 economic crash.

Marianne's acceptance of Jamie's abuse explores the destructive and unhealthy side of love. We see how family dynamics play into this relationship, as Marianne has been abused by her own brother and thinks she deserves to be treated badly.

The novel also shows the ways Marianne's and Connell's love expands and matures over time. They turn out to have something solid in their relationship, as they are both there for each other. In large part due their relationship, despite its ups and downs, they have both become strong enough to separate so that Connell can accept a writing scholarship in New York City while Marianne stays home.

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