In The Kite Runner, Hosseini compared kite fighting to going to war. Identify how the two are similar.

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In chapter 6, Amir anxiously tosses and turns in his bed while waiting for the kite-fighting tournament to begin the next day. Amir draws comparisons between kite-fighting and a soldier preparing to go to war by writing,

I never slept the night before the tournament. I'd roll from side to side, make shadow animals on the wall, even sit on the balcony in the dark, a blanket wrapped around me. I felt like a soldier trying to sleep in the trenches the night before a major battle. And that wasn't so far off. In Kabul, fighting kites was a little like going to war (Hosseini 40).

In addition to Amir comparing his sleepless nights to a soldier attempting to get some rest in the uncomfortable trenches the night before a major battle, he also compares purchasing and examining his kite to the way that a soldier inspects his gear before a battle. Amir draws another similarity between kite-fighting and going to war by saying,

As with any war, you had to ready yourself for battle (Hosseini 40).

Amir then proceeds to explain how he and Hassan used to save their money, buy their own materials, and make their own kites, which they would use in the tournament. However, their homemade kites were not as sturdy or swift as they wanted them to be, and Baba ends up buying them kites from an expert craftsman named Saifo. Similar to a soldier cleaning his weapon and inspecting his gear before entering a battle, Amir and Hassan carefully examine their kites and make sure that their equipment is working properly before the tournament begins.

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It is in chapter six that this analogy is drawn between kite flying and war. Note how Amir describes himself the night before the competition:

I felt like a solder trying to sleeep in the trenches the night before a major battle. And that wasn't so far off. In Kabul, fighting kites was a little like going to war.

As we understand more about the cultural significance of fighting kites, we see Amir's point of view. Fighting kites was a savage competition, where only the merciless and resolute triumph. It was also a way to gain honour and kudos by defeating your opponents. Remember how Amir hopes to win the favour of his father by triumphing in this competition. Reputations are gained and lost, and during the battle, great sacrifice is needed to ensure that you triumph. Note how Hassan's hands bleed with handling the cord. This analogy is not stretched very far at all.

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