In "The Hollow Men" by T.S. Eliot, what have you learned about Eliot's view of humanity after WW I?

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I'm not sure that I would necessarily identify anything specifically "post-war" about the themes of "The Hollow Men." An interesting phenomenon is the continuity of modernist thought between the pre-war and post-war era. We're often told, not incorrectly, that a massive disillusionment among intellectuals and people generally was caused by the carnage of the Great War. Writers who had come of age from 1914 to 1918 were told by Getrude Stein, "You are all a lost generation," as quoted by Hemingway, one of that generation's best exemplars, in The Sun Also Rises. But before the war, Eliot had written "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock." Prufrock seems to be much the same kind of individual, emptied of emotion and desire, as the speaker in "The Hollow Men." It is the same tone in the latter poem, but starker, even more intense and despairing.

It would be false to deny that the post-World-War-I atmosphere had an influence on the mood of "The Hollow Men" but, as stated, negativity had already...

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