Ho claims that Vietnam's independence is consistent with the philosophical principles which the Allies claimed were paramount during World War II. What principles was Ho referring to, and does he make references to occasions where those principles were reasserted?

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Your question is most likely referring to the Declaration of Independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam which was delivered in September of 1945.  Ho Chi Minh was an expert at pointing out the hypocrisy of the West.  In this particular speech, he uses passages from the French and American...

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Your question is most likely referring to the Declaration of Independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam which was delivered in September of 1945.  Ho Chi Minh was an expert at pointing out the hypocrisy of the West.  In this particular speech, he uses passages from the French and American Declarations of Independence.  He wonders why those countries do not feel that the Vietnamese should be afforded the same individual rights.  The most relevant passage to your question is:

We are convinced that the Allied nations which at Tehran and San Francisco have acknowledged the principles of self-determination and equality of nations, will not refuse to acknowledge the independence of Vietnam.

In this passage, Ho Chi Minh mentions how the leaders of the Allies met on two different occasions during the war in order to chart the future of the world.  In those meetings, the issue of self-determination and equality was acknowledged as important for future peace in the world.  Ho Chi Minh feels that the Vietnamese should be afforded these same rights of self-determination and independence.

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