Hi. I need help in writing a metaphor for the sun so I was wondering if you can help me out.

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A metaphor is a comparison that does not use the words "like" or "as." For example, when Shakespeare writes, "all the world is a stage," he is saying that the world, by which he means human society, is like a stage where a play is performed in a theater. This...

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A metaphor is a comparison that does not use the words "like" or "as." For example, when Shakespeare writes, "all the world is a stage," he is saying that the world, by which he means human society, is like a stage where a play is performed in a theater. This metaphor suggests that we are all acting out preset roles.

A metaphor usually focuses on highlighting one aspect of whatever is being compared. Often, it can help to look at other metaphors writers have used to get your imagination going. Ray Bradbury, for example, uses many metaphors for the sun in his short story "All Summer in Day." These include comparisons that would be appropriate for young children, such as the sun being a yellow crayon, a penny, or a fire in a stove.

To write an effective metaphor for the sun, think about what point you want your comparison to make. For example, if you are writing about crossing the desert, the sun might seem like an enemy out to destroy you. What are some other things that destroy life? In this case, you might say that the sun is a scorching ray gun or that the sun is an angry cat digging its claws and teeth into your flesh. It's a good idea to brainstorm, as your metaphors will get better the more you can loosen up.

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Sure, we can help you out.
Start with the foundation: what is your task? Specifically, what is a metaphor?
A metaphor is a figure of speech that creates a link between two things through using a image that is not literally true. So in Sonnet 18, Shakespeare used the metaphor "eye of heaven" to refer to the sun. That's not literally true: the sun isn't literally an eye, nor is it literally part of a spiritual heaven. However, it is shaped like an eye, and shines down on us like divine sight, so the metaphor works.

Your job would be to think about which qualities of the sun you want to apply in your metaphor. The sun is large, it is hot, it dominates the sky, it is the center of the solar system, and it appears to go around the earth. It has qualities that we know through science, but that aren't obvious, like the earth going around it, or the fact that it is a star but not a particularly large or hot star.

So...what do you want to link it with? Family? Who shines brightest in your family? Mother sun warming them all? Love? Love shines, can blind you, but is at times invisible.

Pick your qualities and what you want to link, and you'll have your metaphor.

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