I'm in my first semester of college economics, and the first semester seems easy—but I'm worried about later. Econometrics, statistics, methodology, and maths are going to be difficult. What...

I'm in my first semester of college economics, and the first semester seems easy—but I'm worried about later. Econometrics, statistics, methodology, and maths are going to be difficult. What should I do to prepare?

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samson98 | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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Most students find that college gets more difficult each year. The reason for this is that first-year students tend to take general education courses (classes which all students, regardless of major, must take) such as introductory English and Math. Major-specific classes--which many students save for their last two years--tend to be more difficult because they feature specialized information and are targeted at students in a particular degree program. Thus, you will likely find college gets harder as you progress into the specialized Economics classes. This is confirmed by a 2010 survey, which found students in Economics programs had the third-lowest grade-point averages of among students of all majors. However, difficulty varies from school to school, so you should talk to an upperclassman in your major about their experiences.

If you want to continue in the Economics program, you should consider spreading your degree-specific classes across your remaining semesters at school, rather than trying to take all of them during your last few semesters. Mixing them with general education classes--which tend to be easier--will give you more time to focus on the harder classes. However, if you are worried about the difficulty of the Economics degree, you may want to consider changing to another field which interests you. A great place to start is consulting your guidance counselor; he or she can help you find a major which matches your interests and skill-set.

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