Can someone help me with figures of speech and literary devices from Macbeth, Act I?What figure of speech can be found in this quote:  "but i am faint, my gashes cry for help."  What literary...

Can someone help me with figures of speech and literary devices from Macbeth, Act I?

What figure of speech can be found in this quote:  "but i am faint, my gashes cry for help."  What literary devices can be found in these quotes: "point against point, rebellious arm 'gainst arm", "The instruments of darkness tell us truths, win us with honest trifles, to betray's in deepest consequence. Cousins, a word, I pray you", and "The prince of cumberland! that is a step on which I must fall down, or else o'erleap."

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Noelle Thompson | High School Teacher | eNotes Employee

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Shakespeare has filled Macbeth with numerous figures of speech and literary devices, and these examples are no exception.  In regards to "but I am faint, my gashes cry for help," the figure of speech used here is personification.  Personification is when an author gives something human qualities that has none.  Here the "gashes" are "crying" for help, personifying the word "gashes."  Next, even though you have the following quote in the "literary device" category, it is actually a figure of speech:  "The prince of cumberland! that is a step on which i must fall down, or else o'erleap" is most definitely a metaphor: a comparison of two or more unrelated things without using "like" or "as."  Here the "Prince of Cumberland" is said to be "a step" making the point that he needs to be used to get further or conceded as a stopping point. In regards to literary devices, the two examples are the same literary device: parallelism.  Parallelism is using a balance of two or more phrases or clauses in the same grammatical equation.  For example, "point against point, rebellious arm 'gainst arm" as well as "tell us truths, win us trifles, betray us consequence."  Shakespeare:  a master of his craft!

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