Help me decide whether these are grammatically accurate.1) The strikes throw out of gear all our industries. 2) We have no art and part in the affairs. 3) It being a hot day, I remained in my...

Help me decide whether these are grammatically accurate.

1) The strikes throw out of gear all our industries.

2) We have no art and part in the affairs.

3) It being a hot day, I remained in my tent.

4) He is accused of sitting on the fence because he never takes any side in the arguments.

Expert Answers
Karen P.L. Hardison eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Pertaining to "The strikes throw out of gear all our industries":

The verb "throw out" is a phrasal verb with a fixed relationship between "throw" and its article particle "out".

Phrasal verbs may however be interrupted--and often are interrupted--with other information.

In addition, the phrasal verb "throw out" is part of the idiom "throw out of gear," meaning to unsettle or sabotage etc.

So the correct way to write this idiomatic phrasal is:

"The strikes throw all our industries out of gear."

The phrasal verb is thus correctly interrupted with the noun phrase "all our industries" while the idiom correctly conveys the meaning of being unsettled or sabotaged.

[In future passive you could write it like this: "The industry will be thrown out of gear," which is one way to keep the phrasal verb (now an irregular form past participle) together and uninterrupted.]

In addition, "art and part" is an idiom attributed in various idom dictionaries as derived from Scots law and denoting someone who is an accessory to criminal activity. Therefore, "We have no art and part in the affairs" is a correct form of idiomatic sentence construction.

pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

For the first sentence, I think it is grammatically correct, but it sounds awkward, at least in American English.  We would say that the "strikes throw all our industries out of gear.

The second one sounds proper, but I have never heard the phrase "art and part."  But if it were "we have no part" that would be fine.  Because of that, I do not see any reason that "art and part" would not be proper as long as that is a phrase that is used (which it is not in American English).

The other two are completely fine and they sound quite natural as well.