In The Help, how will Skeeter's book be different from Gone with the Wind?

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Kathryn Stockett's novel The Help is about a young lady named Skeeter and her attempt to help solve the issue of racial conflict in her town. In order to do this, Skeeter enlists the help of several African American maids. Skeeter interviews these maids and writes a book about her discussions with them about the homes they work in and the families for which they work.

Skeeter's book is very different from Gone with the Wind. Both books discuss racial conflict. Skeeter's book differs because she focuses on telling the African American perspective, while Margaret Mitchell, the author of Gone with the Wind, focuses on the white perspective in her novel. Skeeter wishes to tell the story of the maids in her town and to let others know of their hardships so that the lives of these maids can change for the better.

While both novels attempt to expose the issues that exist due to racial inequality, they differ in perspective.

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Skeeter's book, The Help, is not intended to have very much in common with Gone with the Wind. On the surface, of course, both books describe the racial conflict, one during the Civil War, another a hundred years later.

Skeeter's goal in writing The Help is actually to contrast Gone with the Wind by focusing on black--instead of white--people of the South. As she tells her New York publisher, Margaret Mitchell (the author of Gone with the Wind) has already created this "glorified image of Mammy." But, she wonders, has anybody ever considered how Mammy feels about it? Skeeter is on a mission to tell the story of the hardship of Aibileen, Minnie, her own caregiver Constantine, and all other Mammies of Jackson, as opposed to the story of the challenges that a contemporary Scarlett might be facing.

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