I have written an essay comparing George Orwell's 1984 and Cormac McCarthy's The Road focusing on how human spirit over comes dystopian pressures. I now need a few significant differences...

I have written an essay comparing George Orwell's 1984 and Cormac McCarthy's The Road focusing on how human spirit over comes dystopian pressures. I now need a few significant differences between them to add to a conclusion. 

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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[Note to the student: Remember that a conclusion must not present new ideas because it is, in essence, a summation of what has been written in the essay as well as a restatement of the thesis. So, be sure that anything mentioned here as significant differences has, at least, been suggested in the body of your essay.]

Differences between 1984 and The Road:

  • While the setting and overall milieu of The Road is much bleaker than than that of 1984, McCarthy's narrative's overall effect is not morbid as faith in humanity is reaffirmed in the end, while in Orwell's narrative Julia and Winston, although heartfelt in their resistance, both surrender their souls to the dystopian world, ending the novel on a negative note. 
  • Winston surrenders to his environment: "he loved Big Brother." The father of The Road perseveres for years, never surrendering, even in death.
  • Winston and Julia both betray each other, but the father and son are bonded in love. In fact, the father retains his faith only because of his child; his paternal love is far superior to the male/female connection. In  "This is my child....That is my job [to care for him]." The boy tells his dying father, "I'll talk to you every day."  [NB: if you use these quotations, incorporate them in the body of the essay; they are not to be used in conclusions which do not introduce anything new. They are given here merely to show you that the difference is supported in the texts]
  • Fortifying the father's faith and perseverance are real experiences that he summons to his memory such as fishing with his uncle; Winston's memory of his mother is not strong enough to carry him through adversity.
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